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Wednesday, March 11
 

11:00am GMT

Individual consultancy for prospective students of audiovisual preservation at HTW Berlin
Individual consultancy for prospective students of audiovisual preservation at HTW Berlin (registration desk).

Speakers
avatar for Ulrich Ruedel

Ulrich Ruedel

Professor, HTW - University of Applied Sciences Berlin
Ulrich Ruedel holds a doctorate in Analytical Chemistry from the University of Muenster, Germany and has worked on optical biochemical sensors and intellectual property rights before turning to the practice and science of film preservation. As a 2005 graduate of the L. Jeffrey Selznick... Read More →


Wednesday March 11, 2020 11:00am - 12:00pm GMT
BFI Foyer
  • surveys y

12:00pm GMT

Registration (BFI Foyer)
Wednesday March 11, 2020 12:00pm - 1:00pm GMT
BFI Foyer
  • surveys y

1:00pm GMT

Opening the 5th International Colour in Film Conference
Speakers
avatar for Barbara Flueckiger

Barbara Flueckiger

Professor / Principal Investigator, ERC Advanced Grant FilmColors and SNSF Film Colors, University of Zurich
Barbara Flueckiger has been a professor for film studies at the University of Zurich since 2007. Before her studies in film theory and history, she worked internationally as a film professional. She is the author of two text books about “Sound Design” and “Visual Effects”.Since... Read More →
avatar for Ulrich Ruedel

Ulrich Ruedel

Professor, HTW - University of Applied Sciences Berlin
Ulrich Ruedel holds a doctorate in Analytical Chemistry from the University of Muenster, Germany and has worked on optical biochemical sensors and intellectual property rights before turning to the practice and science of film preservation. As a 2005 graduate of the L. Jeffrey Selznick... Read More →
avatar for Elza Tantcheva-Burdge

Elza Tantcheva-Burdge

Vice-Chairman, Colour Group (Great Britain)
Elza Tantcheva-Burdge is presently the Vice- Chairman of the Colour Group (Great Britain). Her background is in both science and art and design. She attained masters in both and worked in industry and research before deciding to combine her interests in colour both in science and... Read More →


Wednesday March 11, 2020 1:00pm - 1:05pm GMT
NFT3/ BFI Southbank
  Welcome Note
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1:05pm GMT

Deciphering the colours - Matteo Falcone (1928) - Keller-Dorian
MATTEO FALCONE (1928)
and
JOURNAL DE BORD (by François Ede)
Courtesy of La Cinémathèque française.

Introductory notes kindly supplied by François Ede.
Acknowledgements: François Ede, Laurent Mannoni and Emilie Cauquy (La Cinémathèque française).

Wednesday March 11, 2020 1:05pm - 1:30pm GMT
NFT3/ BFI Southbank
  Screening, Film
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1:30pm GMT

New Restorations from The Museum of Modern Art

To celebrate The Museum of Modern Art's recent expansion and reopening, the Department of Film initiated a deep dive into its collection to reassess its holdings. The films included in this programme are among the many rediscoveries that have been presented at the Museum since it reopened to the public last October. For years overlooked, or inadequately-preserved, these films have now been painstakingly restored in 4K resolution with every effort made to remain faithful to the original colour palettes. Although only a small selection of films can be shown in this programme, a total of eighteen early colour shorts have been restored as part of this initiative, ranging from handcoloured serpentine dance films from the 1890s, to exquisite stencil-coloured scenics, and previously unseen American Kinemacolor films.

Winsor McCay, the Famous Cartoonist of the N.Y. Herald and His Moving Comics [aka. Little Nemo] (Winsor McCay, 1911)
La voix du rossignol (Ladislas Starevich, 1925)
Technicolor Tests (Pioneer Pictures, ca. 1933-1936)

Restored by The Museum of Modern Art with support from The Celeste Bartos Fund for Film Preservation.

Speakers
avatar for James Layton

James Layton

Manager, Film Preservation Center, The Museum of Modern Art


Wednesday March 11, 2020 1:30pm - 2:45pm GMT
NFT3/ BFI Southbank
  Screening, Film
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2:45pm GMT

Coffee break
Wednesday March 11, 2020 2:45pm - 3:10pm GMT
NFT3/ BFI Southbank
  Break
  • surveys y

3:10pm GMT

IB Tech 1977 tbc (35mm, one reel)
Wednesday March 11, 2020 3:10pm - 3:25pm GMT
NFT3/ BFI Southbank
  Screening, Film
  • surveys y

3:25pm GMT

ERC Restoration Case Study: Multispectral Scanning
Wednesday March 11, 2020 3:25pm - 3:35pm GMT
NFT3/ BFI Southbank
  Screening, Film
  • surveys y

3:35pm GMT

Cinecolor Cartoons
Projection of two Ub Iwerks cartoons in vintage 16mm, double emulsion Cinecolor prints.

Speakers
avatar for Ulrich Ruedel

Ulrich Ruedel

Professor, HTW - University of Applied Sciences Berlin
Ulrich Ruedel holds a doctorate in Analytical Chemistry from the University of Muenster, Germany and has worked on optical biochemical sensors and intellectual property rights before turning to the practice and science of film preservation. As a 2005 graduate of the L. Jeffrey Selznick... Read More →
avatar for Sreya Chatterjee

Sreya Chatterjee

Student, HTW Berlin


Wednesday March 11, 2020 3:35pm - 3:55pm GMT
NFT3/ BFI Southbank

3:55pm GMT

Keynote: The Lindgren Manifesto, Part 1: Chromatic Extinction Rebellion
From a film preservationist’s perspective, colour has been an object of interest from two interrelated perspectives: first, the study of its history, technology, and (to a lesser extent) aesthetics; second, the scientific enquiry on how cinematic color can be made more stable on its original carrier (conservation) and reproduced onto other objects, formats, or media (preservation, duplication). The progress in both domains of inquiry in the past thirty years has been considerable, thanks to the collaborative effort of curators, archivists and scholars.

It is now time to look back at these achievements with a candid assessment of their (sometimes unintended) consequences, and consider the next steps to be taken in order to further enhance the understanding of cinema’s chromatic identities and foster their long-term survival and collective availability. This presentation has, therefore, the twofold aim of discussing colour film preservation as an expression of cultural historiography, and of suggesting possible directions and strategies for its development in the post-photochemical era.


Wednesday March 11, 2020 3:55pm - 4:45pm GMT
NFT3/ BFI Southbank

6:10pm GMT

Public evening screening - MAGNIFICENT OBSESSION (Douglas Sirk, 1954) - Dye Transfer print
We will screen a Technicolor dye-transfer print of Douglas Sirk's Magnificent Obsession at the Fifth International Conference Colour in Film, BFI South Bank in London, with an introduction by Barbara Flueckiger.

Please note that as outlined before, separate tickets are required for this public event.Information on pre-booking tickets for this screening has been sent to registered delegates!

BFI event listing:
https://whatson.bfi.org.uk/Online/magnificentobsessionplusintro

Trailer:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mk10gqsonlg​​​



Speakers
avatar for Barbara Flueckiger

Barbara Flueckiger

Professor / Principal Investigator, ERC Advanced Grant FilmColors and SNSF Film Colors, University of Zurich
Barbara Flueckiger has been a professor for film studies at the University of Zurich since 2007. Before her studies in film theory and history, she worked internationally as a film professional. She is the author of two text books about “Sound Design” and “Visual Effects”.Since... Read More →



Wednesday March 11, 2020 6:10pm - 8:15pm GMT
NFT3/ BFI Southbank
 
Thursday, March 12
 

9:30am GMT

Introduction: FilmColors, an Interdisciplinary Approach
Speakers
avatar for Barbara Flueckiger

Barbara Flueckiger

Professor / Principal Investigator, ERC Advanced Grant FilmColors and SNSF Film Colors, University of Zurich
Barbara Flueckiger has been a professor for film studies at the University of Zurich since 2007. Before her studies in film theory and history, she worked internationally as a film professional. She is the author of two text books about “Sound Design” and “Visual Effects”.Since... Read More →


Thursday March 12, 2020 9:30am - 10:00am GMT
NFT3/ BFI Southbank
  Session
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10:00am GMT

“We will be in the market for some color that is satisfactory”. Negotiating Color Film Technology at Fox

Earl I. Sponable was Chief Engineer and Director of Research for Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation from 1926-1962. His extensive papers span over thirty years of film history and technological developments and document the ways in which the American film industry negotiated innovations. Furthermore, the materials allow us to take a closer look at the quest for ‘satisfactory color’ that preoccupied the film industry for decades.

At Fox, Sponable was keeping up to date with color film technology through his broad network of contacts within the industry and thanks to a series of people who made sure to collect information for him. There were different strategies in place to keep track of the competition and identify potentially satisfactory processes. However, the nature of ‘satisfactory color’ remains unclear. What were the criteria according to which color was evaluated? What needs and expectations was color in film supposed to address?

This case study of the Earl I. Sponable Papers held at Columbia University will reflect upon color film technology as a relational artefact in a large network of actors and needs and to address these questions. With a bottom-up approach to historical documents and historiography the talk will demonstrate how the critical analysis of archival materials challenges and completes current knowledge about the history of color film technology.


Speakers
avatar for Noemi Daugaard

Noemi Daugaard

PhD Candidate, SNSF Film Colors
Bachelor of Arts in English Literature and Linguistics, Film Studies and Art History (2013) and Master of Arts in Film Studies (2015). Since 2016 PhD candidate at the University of Zurich in the framework of the SNSF research project Film Colors. Technologies, Cultures, Institutions... Read More →


Thursday March 12, 2020 10:00am - 10:50am GMT
NFT3/ BFI Southbank

10:50am GMT

Coffee Break
Thursday March 12, 2020 10:50am - 11:20am GMT
BFI Foyer
  Break, Lecture
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11:20am GMT

From Méliès to Technicolor: Artistic Practices and Scientific Strategies for Designing Color Film

The time frame between the 1890s and the mid-1930s is a period marked by intense and rapidly changing technical and aesthetic developments in color film, wherein ‘miraculous’ scientific inventions are interrelated with artistic expressions. This formation is also mirrored in the almost simultaneous gradual rise of art and costume departments in general and production design in particular, in which color played a key role as well.

Based on David Bordwell’s historical poetics and Monika Wagner’s material iconography, this presentation will therefore concentrate on the processes of poetic film making, with particular emphasis on its conceptualization in pre-production and its material realization during production. Thus, in discussing several artistic practices and scientific strategies for designing color film, theories of aesthetic productivity will be interwoven with the development of manifold film materials during the time frame at hand. The iconography of the alchemist will thereby serve as a conceptual metaphor for the interrelated fields of the arts and science, as well as for the formative aspects of creation, material transformation, and color.


Speakers
avatar for Olivia Kristina Stutz

Olivia Kristina Stutz

PhD student, ERC Advanced Grant FilmColors, University of Zurich
PhD candidate on early film color in the research project "Film Colors. Bridging the Gap Between Technology and Aesthetics", funded by an Advanced Grant of the European Research Council, and contributor to the Timeline of Historical Film Colors. My research focuses on the relationship... Read More →


Thursday March 12, 2020 11:20am - 12:00pm GMT
NFT3/ BFI Southbank

12:00pm GMT

Color Mania – Curating the Materiality of Color in Photography and Film in the Museum Context Or: How to bring Historical Film and Photography Color Processes into an Art and Science Exhibition
Color Mania – Curating the Materiality of Color in Photography and Film in the Museum Context
Or: How to bring Historical Film and Photography Color Processes into an Art and Science Exhibition
From September to November 2019, Fotomuseum Winterthur presented the exhibition Color Mania – The Material of Color in Photography and Film. The show was a collaboration between the museum, one of the leading institutions for the presentation and discussion of photography and visual culture, and the innovative and extensive FilmColors research projects (ERC Advanced Grant FilmColors: Bridging the Gap between Technology and Aesthetics and SNSF FilmColors: Technologies, Cultures, Institutions) led by Barbara Flueckiger at the University of Zurich. Combining historical exhibits – items related to the history of color film and color photography – with contemporary artworks, Color Mania offered an experience that allowed for multiple entry points and different readings (and directions of reading) that intersected and combined within the exhibition space. It was conceived as a show that joined both art and science.
This presentation will provide an insight into the Color Mania exhibition project, its background(s), concept and challenges. From the standpoint of the curator (or better: the scholar-preservationist-curator), I will discuss questions related to presenting film colors in the exhibition space and bringing film historical and film technical academic research as well as aspects of preservation, restoration and digitization in form of a museum show to the general public. Moreover, my presentation will also introduce the book Color Mania, which was published on the occasion of the exhibition and which deepens and broadens selected elements and themes of the on-site show.

Speakers
avatar for Eva Hielscher

Eva Hielscher

Film Scholar, Curator and Moving Image Archivist
Eva Hielscher is a film scholar, curator, and moving image archivist. She holds a PhD in art sciences from Ghent University and studied media culture, film history as well as preservation and presentation of the moving image in Weimar, Utrecht and Amsterdam. Before her PhD research... Read More →


Thursday March 12, 2020 12:00pm - 12:40pm GMT
NFT3/ BFI Southbank

12:40pm GMT

Lunch Break and Book Signing Color Mania
Thursday March 12, 2020 12:40pm - 1:40pm GMT
BFI Foyer
  Break
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1:40pm GMT

VeCoScan. Unveiling a New Generation of Archival Film Scanners
VeCoScan (VErsatile COlor film SCANner) is an ERC Proof of Concept project conducted at the department of Film Studies of the University of Zurich. The scope was to develop and test a multi-spectral and versatile film scanner prototype that is able to capture a wide range of historical film colors. The scanner allows screening the colors of film prints via digital projection without further adjustments by color grading. This constitutes a scientifically proven workflow, which is in line with restoration ethical guidelines. The versatility of the scanner also allows extracting the color information of negatives and faded film in the most efficient way, thus improving the result of digital restoration. The multispectral image acquisition is combined with a modular structure which offers a flexible geometrical arrangement of the illumination, owing to the way film is illuminated in analog projection. The working prototype was tested with a variety of historical color film processes and the results were evaluated in parallel analog/digital projection by a group of experts in the field (film scholars and archivists, colorists and scientists). We are happy to share the results of the project at CiF 2020.

Speakers
avatar for Lutz Garmsen

Lutz Garmsen

UZH
Lutz Garmsen is a filmmaker, media artist, apparatus manufacturer, cameraman and animator. He teaches animated film, experimental film and media installation at various universities and institutes, advises and implements artistic media projects, and develops tools for film research... Read More →
avatar for Giorgio Trumpy

Giorgio Trumpy

Research Scientist, ERC Advanced Grant FilmColors, University of Zurich
Giorgio Trumpy is postdoc at the University of Zurich. He studied Conservation Science in Florence, and received his PhD in Scientific Photography from the University of Basel (2013). For two years (2014-2016) was postdoc fellow at National Gallery of Art in Washington DC. His work... Read More →
avatar for David Pfluger

David Pfluger

Research Scientist, ERC Advanced Grant FilmColors, University of Zurich
David Pfluger, born in 1971, made his PhD in physical chemistry at the University of Basel (PhD Thesis: Hochauflösende Absorptionsspektroskopie an Polyacetylen- und Cyanopolyacetylen Kationen, Universität Basel, 2001). After his graduation in 2002 he was working in cinema post production... Read More →


Thursday March 12, 2020 1:40pm - 2:30pm GMT
NFT3/ BFI Southbank

2:30pm GMT

Keynote Colour Group (Great Britan): Scene-referred Colour and Axiom Zero
The modern way of acquiring, processing, and displaying digital movies tempts technicians to think that the central problem to be solved is summarized as “scene-to-screen” – that is, the goal is to accurately capture colour in front of the camera and relay that to exhibition. Even the phrase “colour reproduction” risks invoking this view. I argue that “scene-to-screen” has never been the central problem. Instead, what I call “Axiom Zero” proposes that the mastering display – not the scene – is the appropriate reference point for faithful colour. Certain emergent UHDTV/HDR schemes are confused on this point; to clarify, I offer a definition of “scene-referred colour.” Colour appearance issues are implicated: If the exhibition display or its viewing conditions differ from those of mastering, alterations are required that are not prescribed by classic colorimetry. I outline the required alterations (colour appearance transforms). These alterations are especially important for HDR, owing to the absence of a single standard for an HDR mastering reference display.



Speakers
avatar for Charles Poynton

Charles Poynton

scientist/mathematician, -
I am an independent contractor specializing in the physics, mathematics, engineering, and programming of digital colour (color!) imaging systems, including digital still cameras, digital video, HD/UHD/4K/8K (HDTV/UHDTV), VFX/CGI, and DI and digital cinema (D-cinema) systems. I am... Read More →


Thursday March 12, 2020 2:30pm - 3:20pm GMT
NFT3/ BFI Southbank

3:20pm GMT

Coffee Break
Thursday March 12, 2020 3:20pm - 3:50pm GMT
BFI Foyer

3:50pm GMT

Appearance & Analytics: Sirius vs. Ufacolor
Appearance & Analytics: Sirius vs. Ufacolor

Anke Mebold (DFF – Deutsches Filminstitut & Filmmuseum ), Ulrich Ruedel (HTW Berlin)

The presentation discusses possibilities and limitations in the employment of XRF towards identification of both major German two-colour processes, Siriusverfahren and Ufacolor. In film archives, an odd lack of vintage prints identified as either of these early colour processes from the 1920s and 30s is evident. This ‚absence’ of an important part of German colour film heritage can be attributed to insecurities in visual attribution, but mainly to generally low survival rates of advertising films, missing title sequences, incomplete filmographies and cataloguing, low survival rate of contextual sources, lack of scholarly and archival attention.
Occasionally, strikingly brilliant films or fragments evidencing a two-colour process surface in archival collections. These prints with emulsion on both sides, and applied colour toning – on one side blue-green the other red-orange – can be result of the Agfa-Bipack process, termed Ufacolor, or the Sirius process invented and marketed by Ludwig Horst and his sons.
The presentation explores how laboratory analytics can help towards ID of the colour process employed in producing the film, also in defining the aim of digital restoration. It shall discuss which (combination of) elements can serve as markers for each two-colour process, offsetting these against less helpful elements, which frequently occur from other causes in film stock manufacture, processing and ageing.

To be screened:
MELODIE DER WELLEN (D 1931)  s/w mit 2-Farben Sequenz rot-blau: Sirius Verfahren (?), Ni Pos, 70m, 3min
DIE FLAMME (D 1933)  2-Farben rot-blau + gelb: Ufacolor Verfahren, Ni Pos, 42m, 2min
IN SPANIEN (D 193?) 2-Farben rot-blau + gelb: Ufacolor Verfahren (?), Ni Pos, 15m, 1min

Speakers

Thursday March 12, 2020 3:50pm - 4:40pm GMT
NFT3/ BFI Southbank

4:40pm GMT

Mordants, Microscopy, Spectroscopy: Studying and Identifying Early Color Systems
Mordants, Microscopy, Spectroscopy: Studying and Identifying Early Color Systems

Sreya Chatterjee, Caroline Figueroa Fuentes, Ulrich Ruedel
HTW - University of Applied Sciences, Berlin

Subtractive bi-pack two-colour systems employing both metal and dye toning were widely experimented with in 1930s in the quest of simulating natural colour tones in films. Despite the obvious limitations, these two-colour systems were able to create a semblance of skin tones as well as a curious gamut of colous on the screen, which was employed, for instance, in a number of animated films from that era.
Selected two-colour systems, which were prevalent between 1920s and 1940s, namely Ufacolor, Sirius, Multicolor and Cinecolor have been studied microscopically and through instrumental-analytical chemistry with the aim of scrutinising their visual characteristics and chemical makeup in terms of their mordant constituents.
In this presentation, the results of these comparative investigations of these samples will be presented, observed macroscopically as well as through transmission microscopy, alongside their chemical characteristics as revealed through Fourier-transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) analysis.

Speakers
avatar for Sreya Chatterjee

Sreya Chatterjee

Student, HTW Berlin


Thursday March 12, 2020 4:40pm - 4:55pm GMT
NFT3/ BFI Southbank
 
Friday, March 13
 

9:30am GMT

Chromatic Lighting in Science Fiction Films
Vibrantly flashing spaceships, brightly glowing control lamps and flaming laser weapons—these are typical elements of science fiction films. The creative use of chromatic lights in particular became a recurring stylistic pattern marking the strange and the dangerous in Sci-Fi films shot on chromogenic film stock after 1950.

Starting from a corpus of films from the 1950s to the 1990s, this paper addresses questions such as: Why are aliens recurrently staged with filtered lights up to the 1970s, but not after? And how do coloured lights effect the spatial organization of the filmic image? For this analysis, the concept of defamiliarization provides a useful tool for locating the functions of chromatic lighting as a formal pattern.

Based on David Bordwell’s historical poetics, the aesthetic phenomenon is going to be examined in close proximity to institutional practices and to developments in colour film technology—with special consideration of film stocks and their reaction to this specific type of lighting.

Speakers
avatar for Joëlle Kost

Joëlle Kost

PhD Candidate, ERC Advanced Grant FilmColors


Friday March 13, 2020 9:30am - 10:20am GMT
NFT3/ BFI Southbank

10:20am GMT

How to Save the Environment with ‘Less’. Discourses on Colour Film Preservation and Recycling in the Socialist Planned Economy.
When we talk about environmental problems such as global warming, air pollution and climate change, we address aspects of societies which put natural resources at risk of being permanently affected in negative ways. These stress factors are deeply rooted in (Western) cultures’ approaches to consumption in general and to consumer goods in particular. This second category includes colour film technologies, too. Therefore, it is the right time for questions about the manifold interrelationships between raw film production and environmental concerns in specific global and local contexts. By means of a discourse analytical approach, this paper focuses on selected ecological aspects of film stock manufacturing in East Germany during the growing spread of colour film processes in the second half of the twentieth century.
As homeland of Agfacolor and Orwocolor, the German Democratic Republic (GDR) was part of the global raw film community for more than forty years. In this period, the country faced an ongoing increase of waste products from chemical industries. Around the same time, however, more and more initiatives for long-term solutions in film archiving and preservation created awareness of material decay and technological obsolescence. Within this ambivalent context, discourses on scarcity of resources, durability of colour films and recycling of silver components made their way into technical journals such as Bild und Ton. With its unique role as one of GDR’s official organs for discussing topical technological developments, Bild und Ton acted as a mirror of hegemonic idea(l)s of the country’s socialist planned economy. As such, the journal bears witness to the postponed discussion of environmental issues compared to Western publications. This raises questions about how this delay came about and what the actual situation was like for the population: What did it mean for civil society and industry to tackle environmental issues with less monetary and material resources, less possibilities of influencing production quality and fewer opportunities for political intervention?

Speakers
avatar for Josephine Diecke

Josephine Diecke

PhD Student, SNSF Project Filmcolors. Technologies, Cultures, Institutions
Bachelor of Arts in Film Studies and French Philology at the Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz (2013). International Master of Arts in Audiovisual and Cinema Studies at the Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (2016) with a master thesis on the theoretical, practical... Read More →



Friday March 13, 2020 10:20am - 11:10am GMT
NFT3/ BFI Southbank

11:10am GMT

Coffee Break
Friday March 13, 2020 11:10am - 11:40am GMT
BFI Foyer

11:40am GMT

Color and Genre. Negotiating Color Film Technology, Aesthetic Conventions and Artistic Creation in the 1940s
When thinking about color films in the period of the 1940s one can’t help but also think about the concept of genre. Feature film productions in color during that particular decade can almost exclusively be categorized as pertaining to one of a limited number of genres, first and foremost within Classical Hollywood cinema’s studio system, but also in other national film production contexts.

While most investigations of genre focus on narrative textual analysis or iconographic visual patterns, this talk will aim at a broader investigation of patterns of the mise-en-scene within different genre films and how they relate to the use of color. Working from an extensive corpus of analyzed film, various film examples are used to highlight the commonalities and differences of a number of genre productions, embedding them in their respective production context, and investigating the use of color and its intra- and intertextual functions. In the vein of David Bordwell’s historical poetics and Barbara Flueckiger’s technobole approach to film history, the diverse and intertwining factors influencing color film aesthetic and style – color film technology, production personnel, industry politics, normative ideas – are carved out and reflected to form a differentiated understanding of the role of color film technology and style within genre productions.

Speakers
avatar for Michelle Beutler

Michelle Beutler

PhD Candidate, ERC Advanced Grant FilmColors


Friday March 13, 2020 11:40am - 12:30pm GMT
NFT3/ BFI Southbank

12:30pm GMT

Lunch Break
Friday March 13, 2020 12:30pm - 1:30pm GMT
TBA

1:30pm GMT

2:30pm GMT

Closing Remarks, Outlook - Colour in Film
Friday March 13, 2020 2:30pm - 2:45pm GMT
NFT3/ BFI Southbank